Month: August 2014

The Duty to Share Patient Information

The duty to share information can be as important as the duty to protect patient confidentiality. Vince Kuraitis and Leslie Kelly Hall released a report discussing in depth topics that concern all of us. They have emphasised and pointed out two things that are missing when talking about data sharing: The explicit recognition of a corollary duty to share patient information with other providers when doing so is the patient’s interest, and a recognition that there is potential tension between the duty to protect patient confidentiality/privacy and the duty to share – with minimal guidance on how to resolve the tension. Their article refers to and discusses three main topics: First of all, Vince and Leslie talk about the recent recognition in the UK, giving us examples from one long-awaited study commissioned by the Department of Health. They have identified the key discoveries from The Information Governance Review Report (Caldicott Review), citing in the essay: …safe and appropriate sharing in the interests of the individual’s direct care should be the rule, not the exception. Caldicott review initial report had suggested 6 acknowledged principles for information sharing, but now the recognition of an explicit duty to share patient information was added […]

dbGaP Improves Access for Individual-Level Genomic Data

“dbGaP Collection: Compilation of Individual-Level Genomic Data for General Research Use” is a new data set collection that is expected to become a very useful tool for researchers. Due to many requests from the scientific community, the NIH brought into play a change in the procedures for accessing aggregate-level data. Most of the dbGaP studies have considerable fraction of participants who consented for “General Research use” (GRU) NIH have recognized and acknowledged those consents to be essentially the same, even though the individuals participated in different studies. As a result this collection was created allowing users to obtain the data. Furthermore, in order to make the process of requesting access less painful and faster, it will be reviewed by a single, central Data Access Committee and users can gain entry through a single access request. The process is identical to those for individual-level, controlled-access data and you can find the instructions for requesters here. Investigators being authorized for access to the datasets within the collection will have the standard one-year approval period. In the meantime, one can choose to use data only from some individuals, but will still have access to all of the information. Additionally, the datasets are going to be updated […]

hack day

Hack Day August 2014 Summary

This past weekend, our fourth Hack Day brought together some very enthusiastic people along with the DNAdigest team in the Future Business Centre in Cambridge to discuss the development of the Data Discovery Tool we are working on. We are very excited to say that the day turned out to be very productive. Fiona Nielsen, our CEO, started with a short presentation explaining who we are and what we have done so far. Through the course of the day our attendees divided into three groups each discussing different topics while our team integrated a member into each group so that we could follow up with everyone. Interesting discussions on what exactly can be done to improve the existing prototype on data discovery spread around fast and people were really keen on brainstorming new ideas. Hamza, our Nuffield research student, was going around interviewing. He managed to learn about the workflows and the various online repositories used to access genetic data of three Hack Day participants who use human genomic data in their work. The text mining group explored the options for automatically analysing data set descriptions and labelling them with appropriate ontology tags. One very active contributor was Peter Murray-Rust who […]

Data Discoverability in Public Health

Data Discoverability in Public Health

Making datasets ‘discoverable’ is one of the most crucial boundaries that need to be overcome when talking about effective data sharing. New research on Enhancing Discoverability of Public Health and Epidemiology Research data was commissioned by the Wellcome Trust on behalf of the Public Health Research Data Forum. This Forum gets together major international funders that aim to increase the availability of health research data in ethical, efficient and equitable manner, while the research explores how research funders can ease the identification, access and usage of public health and epidemiological data for researchers and therefore accelerate the progress in public health. The research was undertaken by a team led by Dr Tito Castillo along with the support of a few universities, associations and companies. They have conducted a survey, in-depth interviews and analysis of the existing models for enhancing discoverability of data, key findings appeared. The three possible models were proposed: i) a centralised portal model, ii) a data journal model and iii) a linked data model. It is thought that when combined those would highly improve and accelerate the availability of health research data in an ethical and efficient ways. Nonetheless, the centralised portal model was preferred by the research community and proposed […]

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