Month: October 2014

DNAdigest interviews NGS logistics

NGS logistics is the next project featured in our blog interviews. We have interviewed Amin Ardeshirdavani who is a PhD student involved in the creation of this web-based application. Take a look at the interview to find why this tool has become very popular within KU Leuven. Amin Ardeshirdavani 1. What is NGS logistics? NGS-Logistics is a web-based application, which accelerates the federated analysis of Next Generation Sequencing data across different centres. NGS-Logistics acts as a real logistics company: you order something from the Internet; the owner processes your request and then ships it through a safe and trustful logistics company. In this of NGS-Logistics, the goods are human sequence data and researchers ask for possible variations and their frequency among the whole population. We try to deliver the answers in the fastest and safest possible way. 2. What is your part in NGS logistics? Right now I am a PhD student at KU Leuven and the whole idea of my PhD project is designing and developing new data structures for analysing of massive amount of data produced by Next Generation Sequencing machines. NGS logistics is exactly that. I have done the whole design and development of the application and database. Hereby I […]

NIH Policies Improving Data Sharing

Policies put into place by major funding agencies like the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and to a lesser extent by scientific journals, aim to increase the sharing of scientific resources among life science investigators. There have been a lot of changes in data-sharing policies over the past 10 to 12 years, and new tools for data-sharing have become available. says lead author Genevieve Pham-Kanter , PhD, assistant professor of Health Management and Policy at Drexel University School of Public Health. He also adds: At the same time, there have been moves by many universities and academic health centers to preserve their intellectual property and limit sharing. Since there had been very little systemic evaluation of how these policies have affected scientists and their sharing behavior, we wanted to get a sense of which policies were working and which were not. In order to measure the influence of those policies, Pham-Kanter and her co-authors – Eric G. Campbell, PhD, Mongan Institute for Health Policy at MGH, and Darren Zinner, PhD, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University – launched a survey. Almost 1,000 out of 3,000 investigators completed and returned this survey. 65 percent of them believed that NIH […]

Cambridge news: interview with Adrian Alexa

As you may already know, DNAdigest has recently spun-out Repositive (formerly knows as Nucleobase),  the social enterprise to develop Open Source software tools for researchers. Not long ago, Adrian Alexa, our CTO,  gave an interview for Cambridge News explaining more in depth what lays behind the idea of Repositive. Take a look: That bit in Jurassic Park where Dickie Attenborough explains about Dinosaur DNA (“and bingo… Dino DNA!”) – and then the insect rolls down the tree covered in sap – is, sadly, the total extent of many people’s knowledge of genomic data. You won’t be shocked to hear that there’s quite a lot more to it and, as usual, Cambridge is leading the way. Repositive Ltd (a social enterprise and part of the Social Incubator East programme) is a spin-out of the Cambridge-based charity DNAdigest, fronted by founder Fiona Nielsen and her colleague Adrian Alexa who are both former employees of Illumina (the world leaders in genomic research with a UK office in Saffron Walden). Their mission statement is to ‘empower efficient access and the sharing of genomic data’. Adrian explains: The current practice for sharing and accessing genomic data is very poor. Typically, when a clinic sequences an individual, they will […]

DNAdigest interviews SolveBio

DNAdigest continues with the series of interviews. Here we would like to introduce you to Mr Mark Kaganovich, CEO of SolveBio, who agreed on an interview with us. He shared a lot about what SolveBio does and discussed with us the importance of genomic data sharing. Mark Kaganovich, CEO of SolveBio Could you describe what SolveBio does? SolveBio delivers the critical reference data used by hospitals and companies to run genomic applications. These applications use SolveBio’s data to predict the effects of slight DNA variants on a person’s health. SolveBio has designed a secure platform for the robust delivery of complex reference datasets. We make the data easy to access so that our customers can focus on building clinical grade molecular diagnostics applications, faster.   How did you come up with the idea of building a system that integrates genomic reference data into diagnostic and research applications? And what was the crucial moment when you realised the importance of creating it? As a graduate student I spent a lot of time parsing, re-formatting, and integrating data just to answer some basic questions in genomics. At the same time (this was about two years ago) it was becoming clear that genomics was going […]

Publishing and Sharing Sensitive Data

Some data are born sensitive, some achieve sensitivity, and some have sensitivity thrust upon them! The Australian National Data Service (ANDS) has just released a Guide to Publishing and Sharing Sensitive Data which includes a decision tree to help researchers decide whether they can publish such data. The guide is drawing the best practice for publication and sharing of sensitive research data in the Australian context. It provides genuine, step-by-step advice about what you need to know and do before publishing and sharing your sensitive data, including confidentialising your human and sensitive data, how to legally do that, what to include in a consent form requesting data publication and sharing etc. By following this Guide, and the steps within, you will be able to make clear, lawful, and ethical decisions about sharing your data safely. In most cases it can be done! By definition sensitive data are ‘data that can be used to identify an individual, species, object, process, or location that introduces a risk of discrimination, harm, or unwanted attention’. For example, sensitive human data most commonly refers to sensitive personal information. That is when the information shared can be used to identify a person or group of people. Personal […]

data accessibility

DNAdigest published: A Focus on Data Accessibility

The DNAdigest team is very happy to announce that our paper ‘The need to redefine genomic data sharing: A focus on data accessibility‘ has been published in the special issue of the Journal of Applied and Translational Genomics as an open access publication. At DNAdigest, we are aiming to improve the shared amount of genomic data which current state is far from sufficient. Believing is not enough in this case so it was important for us to get some real numbers! We interviewed genetics researchers and ran an online survey in order to find out how much and in what way genomic data is being shared.   Through those in-depth contextual interviews along the online survey, we have managed to assess the state of genomic data sharing. Our finding showed that, although the procedures that researchers follow differ among universities, industry and clinics, there are still many common steps in their workflows. Unsurprisingly, most of the researchers agreed that they do not share enough data and would like this situation to change. If you want to take a look at what else we have discovered, be welcome to read the whole article: T v Schaik et al, The need to […]

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