Month: November 2014

Code for Genomic and Health-Related Data Sharing

The sharing of scientific, genomic and health-related data for the sake of research is of a fundamental importance in order to provide continuous progress in our understanding of human health and wellbeing. While collaboration for data sharing is increasingly embraced by policymakers and the international biomedical community, we still lack a common ethical and legal framework to connect regulators, funders, consortia, and research projects to facilitate genomic and clinical data linkage, global science collaboration, and responsible research conduct. Such framework will definitely assist in the progress of global science and responsible research conduct. This is why BioSHaRE researchers in collaboration with P3G, the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, IRDiRC (International Rare Diseases Research Consortium), H3Africa and other organizations started to work on the development of an International Code of Conduct for Genomic and Health-Related Data Sharing. This international code will give us the guidance on how to responsibly share genomic and health-related data. It also pushes for better access to the shared data, knowledge, and resources in presently under-served regions. Discussions on the topic had started back in 2013 and are currently continuing. The Code is built around a set of foundational principles and guidelines. It: interprets the right […]

symposium

DNAdigest Symposium 2014 Summary

This past weekend, DNAdigest organized a Symposium on the topic “Open Science in human genomics research – challenges and inspirations”. The event brought together very interested in the topic and enthusiastic people along with the DNAdigest team. We are very pleased to say that this day turned out to be a success, where both participants and organizers enjoyed the amazing talks of our speaker and the discussion sessions. The day started with a short introduction on the topic by Fiona Nielsen. Then our first speaker, Manuel Corpas was a source of inspiration to all participants, talking us through the process he experienced in order to fully sequence the whole genomes of his family and himself and to share this data widely with the whole world.  Here is a link to the presentation he introduced on the day. The Symposium was organized in the format of Open Space conference, where everybody got to suggest different topics related to Open Science or choose to join one which sounds most interesting. Again, we used HackPad to take notes and interesting thoughts throughout the discussions. You can take a look at it here. We had three more speakers invited to our Symposium: Tim Hubbard (slides) talked about how Genomics […]

Best practices for Genomic analysis

Nowadays, rare genetic variants begin to be discovered more and more often. And still no clear guidelines for distinguishing disease-causing sequence variants from the many potentially functional variants present in any human genome are available. Without accurate standards an acceleration of false-positive reports of causality is at a high probability, therefore obstructing the translation of genomic research findings into clinical diagnostics setting and hinder biological understanding of disease. So what are the best practices for genomic analysis? In the paper Guidelines for investigating causality of sequence variants in human disease D. G. MacArthur et al discuss the primary challenges of assessing sequence variants in human disease, integrating both gene-level and variant-level support for causality and introduce guidelines for summarizing in variant pathogenicity and highlight several areas that require further resource development. For us the most interesting part of the paper is the emphasis on the value of sharing sequence and phenotype data from clinical and research samples to the fullest possible extent. D. G. MacArthur team recognises that many investigators and research funders look at data sharing as a moral and professional imperative, nevertheless, sharing of sequence data among testing laboratories has often been blocked, so that many potentially pathogenic […]

symposium

Open Science in human genomics research

UPDATE: only few tickets left – do not forget to register https://dnadigestsym2014.eventbrite.co.uk This November 22nd, DNAdigest is organizing a collaborative symposium. The topic of the event will be “Open Science in human genomics research – challenges and inspirations”. It will take place at the Future Business Centre, Cambridge. You can take a look at this map for directions. At this upcoming collaborative symposium, we will introduce topics like open science, access to sequencing data, privacy concerns around human genomic data, etc., and the schedule of the day will be prepared as a combination of short presentations from invited speakers followed by interactive discussion groups. Join us at the Symposium by signing up here.   You can look forward to inspirational talks to spur excitement and discussions: Manuel Corpas, will talk about how he as a citizen scientist has crowdfunded and crowdsourced the analysis of his personal genome. Linda Briceno, will share her thoughts on legal and ethical implications of data sharing in genomics. Nick Sireau, will talk about how scientists and patients can engage in collaborations, and how Open Science may be either beneficial or challenging in this context. Tim Hubbard, will present how Genomics England is engaging the research community in the 100k […]

DNAdigest interviews Nowomics

This week I would like to introduce you to Richard Smith, founder and software developer of Nowomics. He kindly agreed to answer some questions for our post blog series and here it is – first hand information on Nowomics. Keep reading to find out more about this company.   Richard Smith, founder and software developer of Nowomics 1. Could you please give us a short introduction to Nowomics (goals, interests, mission)? Nowomics is a free website to help life scientists keep up with the latest papers and data relevant to their research. It lets researchers ‘follow’ genes and keywords to build their own news feed of what’s new and popular in their field. The aim is to help scientists discover the most useful information and avoid missing important journal articles, but without spending a lot of their time searching websites. 2. What makes Nowomics unique? Nowomics tracks new papers, but also other sources of curated biological annotation and experimental data. It can tell you if a gene you work on has new annotation added or has been linked to a disease in a recent study. The aim is to build knowledge of these biological relationships into the software to help scientists navigate and discover information, rather than recommending papers […]

research data

Giving research data the credit it’s due

Guest post by Sarah H Carl (@sarahhcarl) In many ways, the currency of the scientific world is publications. Published articles are seen as proof – often by colleagues and future employers – of the quality, relevance and impact of a researcher’s work. Scientists read papers to familiarize themselves with new results and techniques, and then they cite those papers in their own publications, increasing the recognition and spread of the most useful articles. However, while there is undoubtedly a role for publishing a nicely-packaged, (hopefully) well-written interpretation of one’s work, are publications really the most valuable product that we as scientists have to offer one another? As biology moves more and more towards large-scale, high-throughput techniques – think all of the ‘omics – an increasingly large proportion of researchers’ time and effort is spent generating, processing and analyzing datasets. In genomics, large sequencing consortia like the Human Genome Project or ENCODE  were funded in part to generate public resources that could serve as roadmaps to guide future scientists. However, in smaller labs, all too often after a particular set of questions is answered, large datasets end up languishing on a dusty server somewhere. Even for projects whose express purpose is […]

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