Day: 11 March 2015

DNAdigest interviews Genomic Medicine Alliance – Part 2

As promised last week, we are publishing the Part 2 interview with Professor George P.¬†Patrinos about the Genomic Medicine Alliance. Look what more he shared with us. Enjoy the read and stay tuned for our next interviews that are coming soon. Professor George P. Patrinos (University of Patras Department of Pharmacy, Patras, Greece)¬†Member of the Scientific Advisory Committee and Co-Chair of the Genome Informatics Working Group at GMA 4. What is your role in the organisation and how does your personal background support it? I currently serve the GMA as Member of the Scientific Advisory Committee and recently appointed as Co-Chair of the Genome Informatics Working Group, supervising related projects. This role is supported by our academic activities within my research group at the University of Patras, Department of Pharmacy in Patras, Greece and with close collaboration with other colleagues from the University of Patras and other academic institutions in Greece and abroad. 5. The Genomic Medicine Alliance activities are divided into distinct Working Groups. Could you list them for us and briefly describe what they are about and their main aims? GMA research activities span 7 different Working Groups: Genome Informatics, Pharmacogenomics, Cancer Genomics, Rare Diseases and Drug Outcomes, […]

viral metagenomics

Viral Metagenomics in the Field and in the Clinic

I am very happy to present you a summary of the paper “Beyond research: a primer for considerations on using viral metagenomics in the field and clinic” to which our CEO, Fiona Nielsen, is a co-author. The paper by Hall et al discusses the issues arising when considering metagenomics sequencing for critical applications in the field or clinical applications. What is metagenomics? Usually researchers obtain genetic material (e.g. DNA) from a single source – from an individual patient, isolated plant, fungus, bacteria, virus, etc. But in reality, there are many situations in which myriads of different organisms are present together and it is impossible to isolate their DNA individually. Examples include plants, fungi, and bacteria living in soil or water in a certain area, gut flora living in the human digestive tract, different viruses that affect animals and plants etc. Metagenomics studies genetic material obtained directly from environmental samples, allowing one to identify all species present in the sample at once. This makes metagenomics a very powerful diagnostic tool, and clinical laboratories are about to start using it. But before it takes off, there are several serious issues that need to be sorted out. Hall and collaborators highlight some of […]

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