Day: 22 April 2015

OpenTrials

Open Knowledge announce plans for OpenTrials

OpenTrials will collect information about all clinical trials around the world Before any drug goes on the market, it usually takes several years of clinical trials to make sure that the drug is safe to use and is effective against the disease. In reality, some drugs are better than others and many drugs have severe side effects in particular groups of patients. Patients, doctors, researchers and policy makers often rely on the results of clinical trials to make informed decisions about which drugs are best. For multiple reasons, only about half of all clinical trial results are published. Positive results are published twice as often as negative results. And very often not all important details about the methods and findings are published. It is therefore exciting news that Open Knowledge announced the development of OpenTrials – an open, online database of information about the world’s clinical research trials. Open Trials will collect information from different existing sources and provide a clear picture of the data and documents on all trials conducted on medicines and other treatments around the world. The project is designed to increase transparency and improve access to research. It will be directed by Dr. Ben Goldacre (@bengoldacre), an internationally known leader on clinical transparency. You can take a look at his […]

Pickard family

Family Trio Sequencing – Genetic Clues in Autism

This is a guest blog post written by KT Pickard (@kthomaspickard) and Kimberly Pickard (@kimberlypickard), Co-founders of StartCodon. Amazingly, the cost of whole genome sequencing is now 100,000 times less expensive than it was a dozen years ago. If the Tesla Model S followed this trajectory, you could buy one today for less than $1 USD. This super logarithmic decline puts genomics on par with desktop publishing or 3D printing—it has become something that you can affordably do yourself. My wife, Kimberly, and I were excited about the prospect of having our genomes sequenced. Our daughter has autism, and like many parents of special needs children, we were eager to explore the underlying causes of her condition. We “got genomed” last year by enrolling in Illumina’s Understand Your Genome program. We received our whole genome sequencing (WGS) data, as well as limited predisposition and carrier screening for a number of Mendelian traits. As many DNAdigest readers know, the cost of WGS continues to drop in price, almost to the $1,000 genome that Illumina announced last year. Kimberly and I were intrigued to learn that we were both carriers of some rare genetic variants. Could our genetic idiosyncrasies be contributing to our […]

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