Day: 1 September 2015

Blockchain and Digital Health – First Impressions

Guest Post by Rodrigo Barnes, Chief Technology Officer at Aridhia. This blog post was originally published on the Aridhia website on 25 August 2015. The blog post was inspired by the Ethereum Workshop at the Turing Festival in Edinburgh. Among the many great Edinburgh festivals, the Turing Festival is the most important to the tech start-up scene locally and beyond. This weekend, I attended the Ethereum Workshop to learn about a type of “blockchain” technology and to think about how it might facilitate innovation in digital health. There’s even interest in this for genomic data sharing, as the Global Alliance and Kaiser Permanente’s John Mattison has suggested. Most people in tech have heard of Bitcoin, the cryptocurrency that is exciting libertarians and central bankers alike. One thing I learned this weekend is that, at its heart, Bitcoin and related technologies can be seen as essentially ‘open ledgers’ where transactions are recorded in a very public way, and can’t be repudiated. The gist of this is that the open ledger can be trusted, even though because of the way it is implemented, there is no central authority vouching for it. The system of maintaining the ledger is the decentralised processing of the blockchain. The question I asked myself is “how could this be applied to digital […]

DNAdigest interviews Biopeer

Biopeer is a data sharing tool for small- to medium-scale collaborative sequencing efforts and begun its journey from a group of senior students from Bilkent University, Turkey. Today, DNAdigest interviews Can Alkan, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Engineering at the Bilkent University and one of the minds behind Biopeer. 1. Please introduce yourself; what is your background, position? I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Engineering at the Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey. I’m a computer scientist by training, I finished my PhD at Case Western Reserve University, where I worked on algorithms on the analysis of centromere evolution, and then RNA folding and RNA-RNA interactions. Later, I did a lengthy postdoc at the Genome Sciences Department of the University of Washington. I was lucky during my postdoc, that the next generation sequencing started a few months after I joined UW, and suddenly I found myself in many large scale sequencing projects such as the 1000 Genomes Project. Since NGS was entirely new, we needed to develop many novel algorithms to analyze the data. Together with my colleagues I developed read mappers (mrFAST/mrsFAST) specifically for segmental duplication analysis, which we used to generate the first personalized segmental duplication and copy number polymorphism […]

Top