Day: 28 October 2015

The key elements of good data sharing practice

This is a guest post by Wellcome Trust. Originally published on blog.wellcome.ac.uk The Wellcome Trust is a leading partner in the Public Health Research Data Forum, which brings together research funders who are committed to increasing the sharing of health research data in ways that are equitable, ethical and efficient and will accelerate improvements in public health. On behalf of the Forum, the Trust funded a major international study of stakeholders’ views about best practices for sharing public health research data from low and middle income settings, which recently published its results. Dr Susan Bull and Prof Michael Parker, from The Ethox Centre, University of Oxford, discuss the key issues and findings of the study. Data-sharing is increasingly seen as an important component of effective and efficient biomedical research – both by researchers, and research funders. At the same time, it is recognised that efforts to increase access to individual-level data raise important ethical and governance challenges, some of which may vary depending on the context in which the research takes place. The primary argument in favour of more routine sharing of de-identified research data is its potential to generate more – and higher quality – science. This could in turn lead to improved health outcomes, and promoting […]

Information management: to federate or not to federate

This is a guest post by Yasmin Alam-Faruque, member of Eagle Genomics’ Biocuration team. Originally published on eaglegenomics.com Information management is a key organisational activity that concerns the acquisition, organisation, cataloguing and structuring of information from multiple sources and its distribution to those who need it. From a scientist’s perspective, experimental results are the most important pieces of information that are analysed and interpreted to make new biological discoveries. Unless you are the one generating the results, it is not always an easy task to find and gather all other relevant datasets and documents that you need for further comparison and analyses. What is the current approach? Currently, sharing of data between researchers is a manual and complex process, which causes inefficiency since a significant fraction of researcher time is spent on this activity. New high-throughput technologies generating huge datasets are compounding the problem. We argue that new information management approaches based on data federation can help address this problem, thus leading to quicker analyses and discovery of new biological insights. Data federation is a form of data consolidation, whereby data is collected from distinct databases without ever copying or transferring the original data itself. It combines result sets from across multiple source systems and […]

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