Month: November 2015

DNAdigest interviews UX developer from Repositive

Repositive is a social enterprise, building tools to facilitate ethical and efficient genomic data sharing for research. It was spun out of DNAdigest in late 2014. Today we interview Jana Grajciarova, a UX/UI developer of Repositive and find out how user experience studies affect how Repositive is shaping its data discovery and data sharing platform. 1. What is your background? Where did you study and work before? Before I came to UK I studied wooden products and structures at the Technical University of Zvolen in Slovakia. Basically, I learned how to design wooden houses. I find the skills that I learnt there useful for my current web developer’s work when I am doing drawings, sketches, and wireframes. Unfortunately, it turned out to be impossible to find a decent job just with these skills, so I decided to study further. I went to study graphic design at Bedford college. After that I did an internship for a digital marketing company in Bedford. I found that marketing was nothing for me (cultural differences?) but I was fascinated by programming i.e. how you can tell a computer what to do. So, I educated myself in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript and found a job in London. There […]

DNAdigest Interviews EMC

EMC is a global tech organisation renowned for storage and management of big data. With VMware and Pivotal, EMC has moved from storage to virtualisation to app development. And for the last 5 years EMC has developed a new business vertical focused on life sciences. John Gurnett is a member of the global life sciences group at EMC where he works closely with EMC customers to understand how to make EMC products applicable across healthcare and life sciences. In his daily work John works with policy makers from hospitals, clinicians, CEOs from partnering companies, financial controllers and researchers across the board addressing challenges in research and healthcare. One of the main questions that John works on currently is how the DNA sequencing technology can be utilised in a clinical environment. The full impact of the technology will not be realised until its usage is made mainstream. And one of the hurdles to progress is the lack of ‘digitisation’ of the healthcare system. JG: “From this point you cannot do healthcare without IT – We need to digitise everything” The perennial challenge/opportunity is trapping, storing and using data. The countries outside of the US still need to shift to Electronic Health Records (EHR) […]

The upcoming EU Data Protection Regulation: what consequences could it have for research?

As they are now, the EU Parliament’s amendments to the Data Protection Regulation (DPR) prohibit the use of identifiable health data without specific consent and set tough limits on the use of pseudonymised data. Learn what this could mean for research! What is going on? In January 2012, the European Commission proposed a comprehensive reform of data protection rules in the EU. The current rules from 1995 do not cover the areas of globalisation and technological developments like social networks and cloud computing sufficiently. The EU aims to complete the new version of the policy by the end of 2015 meaning that at this very moment representatives from the three EU institutions – the European Parliament, European Commission and the Council of Ministers – are working together to agree on a final text of the draft law. Read here in more detail why the reform of the data protection rules from 1995 is needed. Although the idea to control what is going on with your personal data is good, one can go really far and overprotect things beyond decent levels. For example, What consequences could it have for research? This new regulation as it is now will make the process […]

CODATA report on best practice for research data management policies

Denmark is one of the world leaders in digital health and knows a lot about data and data management. Today we present the report on Current Best Practice for Research Data Management Policies from May 2014 produced by the Danish e-Infrastructure Cooperation and the Danish Digital library. The researchers conducted a survey to identify the key elements of current good practice in research data policies. So, what makes a good policy? According to the study, each good research policy starts with the following considerations: An account of the general drivers and principles: these include the validation of research results, research opportunities for data reuse, the principle of open access by default to the outputs of publicly-funded research, and broader societal and economic benefits. A discussion of the requirements for the effective data sharing: e.g. ‘intelligent openness’ and the need for data to be ‘discoverable, accessible, assessable, intelligible, useable, and whenever possible interoperable to specific quality standards‘. A statement of the necessary limits of openness: these are imposed, in particular, by the need to protect personal information, by the requirement to respect commercial considerations and by security concerns. At the core of each good policy, the following elements are present: A […]

DNAdigest Surveys the BioData World Congress Attendees

On 21-22 October DNAdigest attended the BioData World Congress 2015 held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton. Founder and CEO Fiona Nielsen not only attended the majority of the talks over the two day event, but also took part in the Open Innovation panel and played the role of Amy Friedman in the ‘Genomics in Play’ drama. Additionally, DNAdigest had a stand in a prime location at the event, which was manned by volunteers Craig Smith and Charlotte Whicher. If you’re interested in what people were talking about on Twitter at the conference – you can read the DNAdigest BioData World Congress Storify complete with pictures of presentations from guest speakers and various quotes from talks. Thanks to some strategically placed sweets, we were able to talk to lots of the attendees as well as some of the guest speakers including Dr Robert Green (Harvard Medical School), Dr Bob Rogers (Intel Corporation) and Dr Niklas Blomberg (ELIXIR). During the event, we conducted a short online survey on the genomic data searching / accessing / sharing habits of the attendees and speakers. In exchange for completing the survey we gave away DNAdigest Mugs and T-shirts to 6 lucky winners. Our survey consisted of 3 simple multiple choice questions: The results speak for […]

Top