big data

Get the most out of your impact data

It’s time to put our impact data to work to get a better understanding of the value, use and re-use of research. Published under CC BY 3.0 license. Originally Published by Liz Allen, PhD on the London School of Economics and Political Science Blog If published articles and research data are subject to open access and sharing mandates, why not also the data on impact-related activity of research outputs? Liz Allen argues that the curation of an open ‘impact genome project’ could go a long way in remedying our limited understanding of impact. Of course there would be lots of variants in the type of impact ‘sequenced’, but the analysis of ‘big data’ on impact, could facilitate the development of meaningful indicators of the value, use and re-use of research. We know that research impact takes many forms, has many dimensions and is not static, as knowledge evolves and the opportunities to do something with that knowledge expand. Over the last decade, research institutions and funding agencies have got good at capturing, counting and describing the outputs emerging from research. A lot of time and money has been invested by funding agencies to implement grant reporting platforms to capture the myriad outputs and products of research (e.g. […]

ecology concept

Ecological Perspective on Data Sharing

We have invited Charlie Outhwaite (@charlielouo) to write a guest blog post on the topic of openness and data sharing from an ecological point of view. The post give us the great opportunity to draw a parallel on how the same type of data sharing problems we are experiencing in the field of genomics are observed across different scientific disciplines. The field of ecology is a vast and varied one. As a result, the types and quantities of data produced differ hugely.  Whether a study is small in scale, such as a field or lab based project, or a large, country or global scale, big data study: the amount of data that could be made available is enormous.  Yet the field of ecology has been considered as behind in terms of its openness when compared to other areas of biology such as genomics. With such vast amounts and types of data available, sharing that data openly has the potential to boost research opportunities and open up collaboration within and between fields. As is the case within many scientific disciplines, a major barrier for data sharing in ecology is the fear of being scooped. For this reason, many researchers would be unlikely […]

BioData World Congress 2015

BioData World Congress 2015

Genomics, big data and bioinformatics mark the start of the journey, while personalised medicine is the end goal. How we get there will depend on whether we can get usable intelligence from the data – and then acting on it. The BioData World Congress, organized by the Health Network Communications Limited will take place from 21st October to the 22nd October 2015 at the Wellcome Trust Conference Centre in Cambridge, UK. The conference will: examine the science and technology that is shaping and revolutionising our understanding of complex biological processes review the game changing innovation, roadblocks, critical success factors in the utilisation of genomic data How big data is driving developments in personalised medicine bring senior scientists within academia, pharma and biotech companies in order to facilitate discussion and partnerships Join the world leading life science research institutions at BioData World Congress at the Wellcome Genome Campus and help make personalised healthcare a reality. The conference will feature speakers and poster sessions across four topics: Bioinformatics, Cloud Computing, Next-generation Sequencing and Personalised Medicine. Fiona Nielsen, our CEO, will be one of the official speakers during day two of the conference and will be happy to chat with any of the […]

Paper money with pound coins stacked on it.

Science Funding: Big Data, Big Spending?

The UK government has committed to spending almost six billion pounds on research infrastructure over the next 5 years. Investments of £1.1 billion per annum from 2016 to 2021 mean the potential to reshape science research infrastructure and secure the future of the UK as a knowledge-based economy. But lets not get too excited just yet. Of course it all depends on how the money is spent. With competing interests and many projects, new and old, vying for a slice of the funds, the billion pound investment can only stretch so far. In recent years prominent scientists have spoken out about (and against) the way science funding is allocated. With media pressure continuing to rise with the increase in online social platforms it seems that the projects that can grab headlines are doomed to be favoured over less ‘glamorous’ options. Yet we have the opportunity to have our own say, to ignore media hype and to comment on what really matters. The Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) has launched a consultation exercise to gather a wide range of views. Science is truly a field that affects us all, however, it is plagued by a lack of public scientific […]

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