clinical trials

British Medical Journal

BMJ Extends Their Data Sharing Policy

BMJ is one of the first medical journals and now known as a global brand with a worldwide audience. It aims to help medical organisations and clinicians tackle today’s most critical healthcare challenges by publishing new academic research, providing professional development solutions and creating new information-analysis tools. In January 2013, BMJ came up with a data sharing policy which made the medical journal one of the first with such regulation. This initial policy was focused mainly on sharing of individual patient data for trials of drug and devices specifying that such trials would be considered for publication only if the authors agreed to make the relevant anonymised patient level data available on reasonable request. As the movement to make data from clinical trials widely accessible has achieved enormous success, BMJ has decided to expand their requirements. From the 1 July, BMJ started applying their data sharing policy to all submitted clinical trials, not just those that test drugs or devices. Making anonymised patient level data from clinical trials available for independent scrutiny will allow other researchers to replicate key analyses, reduce the possibility that studies will be unnecessarily duplicated, and maximise the use of the information from trials. An initial investment […]

OpenTrials

Open Knowledge announce plans for OpenTrials

OpenTrials will collect information about all clinical trials around the world Before any drug goes on the market, it usually takes several years of clinical trials to make sure that the drug is safe to use and is effective against the disease. In reality, some drugs are better than others and many drugs have severe side effects in particular groups of patients. Patients, doctors, researchers and policy makers often rely on the results of clinical trials to make informed decisions about which drugs are best. For multiple reasons, only about half of all clinical trial results are published. Positive results are published twice as often as negative results. And very often not all important details about the methods and findings are published. It is therefore exciting news that Open Knowledge announced the development of OpenTrials – an open, online database of information about the world’s clinical research trials. Open Trials will collect information from different existing sources and provide a clear picture of the data and documents on all trials conducted on medicines and other treatments around the world. The project is designed to increase transparency and improve access to research. It will be directed by Dr. Ben Goldacre (@bengoldacre), an internationally known leader on clinical transparency. You can take a look at his […]

Padlock holding blue doors shut

Data Hoarding Kills

It may seem dramatic but data hoarding really does kill, as more and more findings show. Fast technological advances should mean faster research, faster diagnoses and faster cures. But data hoarding is slowing this process down and preventing these technological advances from having the efficient and effective results that they should. As recode.net reports, huge research institutions – from IBM to UC Berkeley –  are backing artificial intelligence and big data to develop better treatments for genetic disease. But while data hoarding continues to be common practice in research these computational tools can only produce limited results. To harness the power of these computation tools we need to open up data. The regulations need to move with the technology. Through innovative solutions data can be kept secure and anonymous without being locked away and untouchable. The consequences of data hoarding are real. Lives will be saved with improved data access. Much of the research is already out there, and the technology to quickly analyse hundreds of thousands of clinical trials and genomic data is fast being developed. Yet accessing the data remains a problem. And its one that we need to solve. Read the full story on recode.net here.  

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