Lynch Syndrome

AliveAndKickin

The War Against Cancer

This is the second part of a guest blog post written by Dave Dubin. Read the first part here. Let’s see how far we’ve come… Since 2007, we have written, made appearances, and held events in order to bring awareness to what I have gone through with the goal of reaching a younger audience, including women.  Every conference we’ve attended has talked about the under-fifty age group, whose numbers are increasing every year, as well as genetics and genetic testing, even genomics.Soccer is a worldwide game, with as many women participating as men, and it encompasses all ages and levels of ethnicity and socioeconomic background.  We have had events with women’s and men’s professional soccer teams from the National Women’s Soccer League, Major League Soccer, North American Soccer League and college teams. My voice has been used to narrate videos and I’ve moderated a webinar about knowing your family history. Today, cancer is as much about finding the proverbial “needle in the haystack” as it is about curing and prevention. Immunotherapy is a big topic. If a group of individual family members all get a certain genetic mutation, and only two of the three siblings are affected by the disease, […]

aliveandkickin

A patient advocate for cancer research

This is the first part of a guest blog post written by Dave Dubin. Read the second part here. 1997 seems so far away.  I’m 29, still a strapping 200 plus pounds, playing soccer, managing the business, recently married with first house and first son.  As much as “family history of colon cancer” is written all over the chart, I’m sent away by my primary physician when I have symptoms.  A few months later, symptoms of blood in the stool and cramping don’t go away.  A gastroenterologist finally confirms stage three colon cancer.  I have what will become the first of several surgeries at Mt Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, and the start of what would become much more than a patient-doctor relationship with Gastroenterologist Blair Lewis and Brian Katz, my surgeon. Three years after my surgery, my older brother develops colon cancer.  Since he started getting screened by Blair Lewis after my episode, his is caught earlier.  Brian Katz is his surgeon as well, and since laparoscopic surgery is now more prevalent at Mt Sinai, his is less invasive and scars are smaller.  No chemo.  I notice how my parents have a difficult time watching their son go through this.  […]

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