patients

DNAdigest interviews Patients Know Best

Dr Mohammad Al-Ubaydli is the founder and CEO of Patients Know Best, an organisation that moves the data custodianship into the hands of the patients, to facilitate data sharing and data access between the patient and the clinicians or service providers. We interviewed Mohammad about his views of data sharing in the domain of genetics research and he gave a number of examples of how data sharing is a multi-faceted problem, and several aspects of the problem are not often discussed. What is your background? I’m a physician and programmer from Cambridge – I wrote six books about IT in health care, two of which explain how to share medical records with patients – and I’m a patient with a rare disease. Because of my interest in patients understanding their records and thus their health I started Patients Know Best, a social enterprise that puts patients in control of their data. It is currently used by over 100 customers across 8 different countries, including one customer rolling this out for over 1 million patients’ records. “Data sharing for medical research is a good thing” – or not? What is your take? I think making data available for medical research is […]

DNAdigest interviews the open study “Genes for Good”

Scott Vrieze, External Collaborator at Genes for Good 1. What is Genes for Good? Genes for Good is a research study led by Dr. Goncalo Abecasis at the University of Michigan, with the goal of discovering genes that affect risk for physical and mental health. Making these discoveries benefits from very large numbers of participants who are continually engaged with the study over time. To do this, we have created a Facebook App (apps.facebook.com/ genesforgood) where individuals may sign up, answer questions about their health and habits, and provide a saliva sample. DNA in the saliva will then be genotyped and tested for association with the health information. This kind of study has been quite successful in finding risk genes for a wide variety of diseases, and Genes for Good will continue this tradition, hopefully on a larger scale with many tens of thousands of participants.   2. What is your role in the Genes for Good study and how does your professional background fit? Genes for Good is intended to be an open platform. Researchers who are interested in contributing can very easily do so. I am a clinical psychologist interested in mental health issues like depression, anxiety, and […]

Bringing Genomics to the Clinic: upcoming event of the Cambridge Rare Disease Network

What is a rare disease? Rare (or orphan) diseases are defined as conditions affecting less than 1 in 2,000 people in the EU, or less than 200,000 people in the US, or less than 50,000 people in Japan. In the UK, 1 in 17 people has or will develop a rare disease at some point in their life. There are approximately 6,000 rare diseases identified today and the number is growing. 75% of all rare diseases affect children and 30% of rare disease patients die before the age of 5. 80% of rare diseases are of genetic origin, whilst 20% are the result of infections (bacterial or viral), allergies and environmental causes, or are degenerative and proliferative. Rare diseases are characterised by a broad diversity of disorders and symptoms that vary not only from disease to disease, but also from patient to patient suffering from the same disease. Rare diseases are often chronic and life-threatening and are difficult to diagnose. On average, it takes 6-8 years to diagnose a rare disease. One of the biggest problems is that usually there are no drugs specifically targeting a given rare disease. And since the potential market segment would be quite narrow, pharmaceutical companies are usually […]

The Patient Charter

Genome sequencing: What do patients think?

Guest post by Alice Hazelton from the Genetic Alliance UK Genomic information has the potential to transform healthcare. Researchers are continually learning more about the genome and the genetic basis of disease and as the cost of genome sequencing technologies and analytics tools decrease, more and more research will become possible. This will help us to achieve a greater understanding of how our genes affect our health and develop new diagnostic tools, screening methods and treatments for some conditions. The sharing of patient data will play a crucial role in this. Whenever the sharing of patient data is discussed, public debate ensues over concerns about data security, privacy and access. But little work has been done to establish what patients, as the end-beneficiaries of medical research, think about sharing data. Through an online engagement project, ‘My Condition, My DNA’, Genetic Alliance UK sought the views of patients affected by rare and genetic conditions, both diagnosed and undiagnosed, on genome sequencing. Four sessions including text, podcasts, videos and questions were distributed to patients over the course of four weeks, allowing them to take part in their own homes at a time convenient for them. One of these sessions was about the use […]

Code for Genomic and Health-Related Data Sharing

The sharing of scientific, genomic and health-related data for the sake of research is of a fundamental importance in order to provide continuous progress in our understanding of human health and wellbeing. While collaboration for data sharing is increasingly embraced by policymakers and the international biomedical community, we still lack a common ethical and legal framework to connect regulators, funders, consortia, and research projects to facilitate genomic and clinical data linkage, global science collaboration, and responsible research conduct. Such framework will definitely assist in the progress of global science and responsible research conduct. This is why BioSHaRE researchers in collaboration with P3G, the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, IRDiRC (International Rare Diseases Research Consortium), H3Africa and other organizations started to work on the development of an International Code of Conduct for Genomic and Health-Related Data Sharing. This international code will give us the guidance on how to responsibly share genomic and health-related data. It also pushes for better access to the shared data, knowledge, and resources in presently under-served regions. Discussions on the topic had started back in 2013 and are currently continuing. The Code is built around a set of foundational principles and guidelines. It: interprets the right […]

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