PLoS

Objections to data sharing don’t stand up to scrutiny

Who’s afraid of Open Date: Scientists’ objections to data sharing don’t stand up to scrutiny. Many scientists are still resisting  data sharing calls. Whilst their concerns should be taken seriously, Dorothy Bishop doesn’t think the objections withstand scrutiny. Concerns about being scooped are frequently cited, but are seldom justified. If we move to a situation where a dataset is a publication, then the original researcher will get credit every time someone else uses the dataset. And in general, having more than one person doing an analysis is an important safeguard for science. I was at a small conference last year, catching up on gossip over drinks, and somehow the topic moved on to journals, and the pros and cons of publishing in different outlets. I was doing my best to advocate for open access, and to challenge the obsession with journal impact factors. I was getting the usual stuff about how early-career scientists couldn’t hope to have a career unless they had papers in Nature and Science, but then the conversation took an interesting turn. “Anyhow,” said eminent Professor X. “One of my postdocs had a really bad experience with a PLOS journal.” Everyone was agog. Nothing better at conference drinks than a new twist on […]

When Counting is Hard: the Making Data Count project

This is a guest post by Jennifer Lin, project manager for the Making Data Count project. Originally published here. Counting is hard. But when it comes to research data, not in the way we thought it was (example 1, example 2, example 3. The Making Data Count (MDC) project aims to go further – measurement. But to do so, we must start with basic counting: 1, 2, 3… uno, dos, tres… MDC is an NSF-funded project to design and develop metrics that track and measure data use, “data-level metrics” (DLM). DLM are a multi-dimensional suite of indicators, measuring the broad range of activities surrounding the reach and use of data as a research output. Our team, made up of staff from the University of California Curation Center at California Digital Library, PLOS, and DataONE, investigated the validity and feasibility of using metrics by collecting and investigating the use of harvested data to power discovery and reporting of datasets that are part of scholarly outputs. To do this, we extended Lagotto, an open source application, to track datasets and collect a host of online activity surrounding datasets from usage to references, social shares, discussions, and citations. During this pilot phase we […]

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