report

A new genome editing review from Nuffield Council on Bioethics

In September 2016, Nuffield Council on Bioethics presented Genome editing: an ethical review. The summary below is written by Jessica Cussins and is originally published here. Reposted with the author’s permission. 7 Highlights from Nuffield Council’s Review on the Ethics of Genome Editing Posted by Jessica Cussins, Biopolitical Times guest contributor on October 18th, 2016 The UK Nuffield Council on Bioethics’ recently released report, Genome Editing: an ethical review  (full version available here) is the most substantial and thorough assessment of its kind. It delves deeply into the ethical, social, and political underpinnings and implications of genome editing, and touches on related, converging technologies including synthetic biology, gene drives, and de-extinction. A second report with ethical guidance regarding the use of genome editing for human reproduction is due in early 2017 from a Council working group chaired by Karen Yeung. This first report will be an important reference for people across disciplines for some time, and I will not do justice to its scope and breadth here. However, I want to draw attention to just seven concepts that are particularly helpful and illuminating, as much for their framing of the questions at stake as for their content. I briefly summarize […]

Data sharing to support UK clinical genetics and genomics services

This is a guest post by Sobia Raza – a policy analyst specialising in data science at the PHG Foundation. Originally published here under the title “Responsible, proportionate data sharing for better and safer genetic services”. Introduction The PHG Foundation, are a health policy organisation with a focus on how genomics and other emerging health technologies can provide more effective, personalised healthcare. The Association for Clinical Genetic Science (ACGS), are the professional association for clinical genetics scientists in the UK. The two organisations have recently collaborated to deliver a joint report which examines the challenges to data sharing within UK clinical genetics and genomics services and to identify priority areas for policy development. The report underscores how data sharing is essential to the delivery of NHS clinical genetics services and the clinical care of patients. Access to high quality data on genomic variants can not only inform the diagnosis and clinical management of patients, but also reduce the risk of potential misdiagnoses arising from insufficient or incorrect information about these variants. Other serious consequences of sub-optimal data sharing are delays in patient diagnosis and variations in the quality of testing services. Yet despite the clinical importance of data sharing, current […]

CODATA report on best practice for research data management policies

Denmark is one of the world leaders in digital health and knows a lot about data and data management. Today we present the report on Current Best Practice for Research Data Management Policies from May 2014 produced by the Danish e-Infrastructure Cooperation and the Danish Digital library. The researchers conducted a survey to identify the key elements of current good practice in research data policies. So, what makes a good policy? According to the study, each good research policy starts with the following considerations: An account of the general drivers and principles: these include the validation of research results, research opportunities for data reuse, the principle of open access by default to the outputs of publicly-funded research, and broader societal and economic benefits. A discussion of the requirements for the effective data sharing: e.g. ‘intelligent openness’ and the need for data to be ‘discoverable, accessible, assessable, intelligible, useable, and whenever possible interoperable to specific quality standards‘. A statement of the necessary limits of openness: these are imposed, in particular, by the need to protect personal information, by the requirement to respect commercial considerations and by security concerns. At the core of each good policy, the following elements are present: A […]

Accessing health and health-related data: report from the Council of Canadian Academies

Canada is investing a lot of effort and resources into its healthcare system. To ensure that it provides the best possible care, high quality research data must be regularly fed into the system. Much of the data relevant to health research arise from interactions within the health system — every encounter with a physician, a pharmacist, a laboratory technician, or hospital staff generates data. The amount of data has grown significanly in the last several years. Due to the advances in information technolody, there are multpile ways to manage health and health-related data. Understanding the best ways to access, store, and govern these data is an important issue for Canada and Canadians. In 2013, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) asked the Council of Canadian Academies to answer the following question: What is the current state of knowledge surrounding timely access to health and social data for health research and health system innovation in Canada? The Panel of Canadian experts examined the technological and methodological challenges of accessing data; the benefits and risks of such access; legal and ethical considerations; and best practices for governance mechanisms that enable access. This report provides a foundation of knowledge that will support […]

“Governance of data access” – a brand new report from EAGDA

The Expert Advisory Group on Data Access (EAGDA). Research funders are generally interested in maximising the value from the datasets generated by research, as well as in improving data management and accessibility practices. At the moment, many UK funders are actively working together to harmonise their research data policies. The Expert Advisory Group on Data Access (EAGDA) was established in 2012 by the Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK, the Economic and Social Research Council, and the Medical Research Council to provide strategic advice to these funders on the emerging scientific, legal and ethical issues associated with data access for human genetics research and cohort studies. EAGDA supports current and future studies and also seeks to enhance the UK’s input into international policy discussions on data access. Research data can often be highly valuable for use beyond the original study in which it was collected, and there has been a recent shift among funders, policy makers, publishers and the research community towards encouraging and enabling the sharing of research data with secondary users. A key challenge for researchers producing these datasets is in ensuring that the right balance can be struck between protecting the rights and interests of research participants, and maximising the […]

The culture of scientific research in the UK

The Nuffield Council on Bioethics. Ethics is concerned with what is good and what is bad for individuals and society. Bioethics is a branch of ethics studying the issues arising from the biological and medical sciences. In 1991, the Nuffield Foundation established the Nuffield Council on Bioethics as an independent body that examines and reports on ethical issues in biology and medicine. Since 1994 it has been funded jointly by the Nuffield Foundation, the Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council. The Council has achieved an international reputation for advising policy makers and stimulating debate in bioethics. The reports of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics cover multiple topics including public health, research in developing countries, animal research, biofuels, genetically modified crops in developing countries, neonatal medicine, emerging biotechnologies and so on. The main characteristic of these reports is their impartiality: they are based on exhaustive research work conducted under the supervision of independent renowned researchers. An unfortunate fact is that most of these reports are quite lengthy and use “high Academian” – a language not easily understood by people without research experience and scientific background. At DNAdigest we pay close attention to research reports published by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. Today we present the highlights […]

Publishing and Sharing Sensitive Data

Some data are born sensitive, some achieve sensitivity, and some have sensitivity thrust upon them! The Australian National Data Service (ANDS) has just released a Guide to Publishing and Sharing Sensitive Data which includes a decision tree to help researchers decide whether they can publish such data. The guide is drawing the best practice for publication and sharing of sensitive research data in the Australian context. It provides genuine, step-by-step advice about what you need to know and do before publishing and sharing your sensitive data, including confidentialising your human and sensitive data, how to legally do that, what to include in a consent form requesting data publication and sharing etc. By following this Guide, and the steps within, you will be able to make clear, lawful, and ethical decisions about sharing your data safely. In most cases it can be done! By definition sensitive data are ‘data that can be used to identify an individual, species, object, process, or location that introduces a risk of discrimination, harm, or unwanted attention’. For example, sensitive human data most commonly refers to sensitive personal information. That is when the information shared can be used to identify a person or group of people. Personal […]

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